Group games, team games, ice breakers - Page 4 of 4 - How to play icebreakers, group games, fun games, party games, teambuilding activities!

Mother May I?

Summary: Mother May I is a classic kids’ game in which kids request to take a certain number and type of steps (baby, normal, giant, etc.) towards the “mother”. Kids must remember to ask “Mother May I?” The first to touch the mother wins and becomes the new mother. Ages: Younger kids. Recommended number of people: Less than 10. Messiness factor: Might break a little sweat. Materials required: None. Recommended setting: Outdoors. Mother May I (also known as Captain May I) How to Play This game is a simple childhood action game that might be good for reinforcing the use of manners. One person is chosen as the “mother” (or “captain” if it is a male). She or he stands facing away from a line of kids and selects a child at random, or in order. The mother/captain calls out a direction, step type, and number of steps. For example, the mother/captain can say: “Scott, you may take seven (or any other number)’ baby/normal/giant steps forward/backward.”The child then responds with “Mother may I?” (or “Captain may I?” if it is a male player in charge). The mother/captain states “Yes” or “No”, depending on her whim, and the child obeys and takes the steps. If the child forgets to ask “Mother may I?” then he/she goes back to the beginning of the line. The first one to touch the Mother/Captain wins and becomes the new Mother/Captain. An alternate version of the game is similar: each child takes turns asking, “Mother/Captain may I take [x kind of] steps?” The child who is mother (or captain) replies yes or no. There are other...
Superlatives Game

Superlatives Game

Summary: An icebreaker where players must quickly arrange themselves in proper order — smallest to biggest, farthest away to closet, least to most, etc. Ages: All. Recommended # of People: Teams of 5 or more. Messiness Factor: A little hectic. Materials Required: None. Recommended Setting: Indoors. Superlatives Game A good, brief icebreaker game that can be an interesting way to see how people compare. Get to know other players in silly categories. The goal is for players to reorder themselves as quickly as possible. Instructions: Teams should be medium to large size, about five players or more. Large groups are okay, but ideally teams should be about 5-10 people. To begin, have the facilitator ask all teams to stand up. He or she announces a category, such as: “How many letters are in your first name? From shortest to tallest.” “Where is your birthplace? Arrange from the person most farthest away to the person closest to your current city.” “How many hats do you own? From least to most.” “How many brothers or sisters do you have? From least to most.” “Height, from shortest to tallest.” As soon as each superlative is announced, teams quickly figure out the proper order and sit down when done. The judge checks to make sure they have done it correctly. The first team to do it right wins the round. Have fun and be creative with the...
Simon Says

Simon Says

Summary: A classic kids’ icebreaker/stationary game in which the leader, Simon, instructs people to do various actions. The goal is to only do something when Simon says so, and to do nothing when he doesn’t. Ages: All ages. Recommended number of people: Any size group, including large groups. Messiness factor: No sweat. Materials required: Nothing. Recommended setting: Indoors. Simon Says Game Simon Says is a classic game that is traditionally played by kids and families, although it can also work with college students and adults as a lighthearted icebreaker. How to Play Simon Says One person plays the role of “Simon”, and he or she stands facing the crowd. Simon explains the rules: “I am Simon. I will give you instructions to do various actions, and you must imitate my actions. I will instruct you to do various things by saying ‘Simon says, do something’, where something is an action like touching your head, waving your hand, and so on. If you do something without me saying ‘Simon says’, then you are eliminated for that round.” Simon (the game facilitator) then proceeds to say various commands (while demonstrating the action), sometimes beginning them with ‘Simon says’, and other times not. These commands can include the following (be creative!):   Pat your head Smile Wave hello Flex your biceps Touch your toes Turn around Strategies for Simon A good way to get many people eliminated at the very beginning of the game is to explain the rules, and then say: “Ready to play? Okay, everybody stand up.” Whenever many people stand to their feet, they will all be eliminated for...
Mafia Game

Mafia Game

Summary: A stationary group game involving lots of strategy. People play as a member of the mafia, police, or town. The object is eliminate the mafia before they eliminate the entire town. Ages: 14 and up. Recommended number of people: A groups of 8 to 12. Messiness factor: No sweat. Materials required: A deck of cards to determine who plays which role. Recommended setting: Indoors. Mafia Game This stationary game (originally invented by psychology student Dimitry Davidoff in Russia, 1986) is a popular group game involving strategy and bluffing. It is good for discussing topics such as lying, deception, trust, good versus evil, etc. or just for a fun time. There are five roles one can play: one narrator, two members of the mafia, two members of the police (or one the group is not large), one doctor, the remaining people are townspeople. Setup The narrator needs to prepare the right number of playing cards to set up the game. He or she takes out two aces (which represent mafia), two kings (which represent police), one queen (which represents the doctor), and several number cards (one for each of the remaining roles to be played). Therefore, if there are 12 people playing, there would be two aces, two kings, one queen, and seven number (non-face) cards, adding up to 12 cards. The narrator shuffles these cards and each person randomly selects a card, without revealing his or her identity. The person assumes the role for the round. Roles Ace card: Anyone who gets an Ace card is a Mafia member. Their goal is to keep secret that they are...

Welcome to Group Games!

Free instructions to 67+ of the best group games! Perfect for your next event. Read, play and share our site! See the full list here. Game ideas are also organized by group type and...
We Want Photos of You Playing Games!

We Want Photos of You Playing Games!

Here’s your chance to become famous.. well, sort of. We have lots of instructions for fun games, icebreakers, and activities, but wouldn’t it be great to see them in action? We want to be able to show photos of you and your group playing our games. Please send your photos to our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/groupgameswebsite — it’s especially cool if you have the word “group-games.com” somewhere within the picture, but either way, send ’em over! If we like your photo(s), we’ll use it on our website and give you a shoutout. Simply mail them to us, tell us a little about your group, and we’ll make you...
Group Games in Action: Games in Nepal!

Group Games in Action: Games in Nepal!

Raman Bhattarai of Team Nodan sent us some great photos of group games in action all the way from Kathmandu, Nepal. Thanks Raman! It sure looks like people from all over the world know how to have fun. Check out the action packed photos by clicking on “view instructions” below — and please continue to send us more photos of you and your group playing games! Whether it’s New York City, the suburbs of Pittsburgh, London, Singapore, Melbourne, Bombay, or Kathmandu… no matter where you are, thanks for making Group-Games.com the best international community of group games on the web! Great photos of group games in action in Nepal. These folks sure look like they know how to have a great...

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Group Games in Action: Human Knot

Group Games in Action: Human Knot

Janet B. from San Jose sent us these great photos of the Human Knot Game in action! The object of the game is to untangle the human knot without letting go of the hands. Thanks Janet for the snapshots! Please continue sending us photos (email: group-games at hotmail.com), and we’ll feature your group on our website...
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