Team Building Archives - Group games, team games, ice breakers
Photo Scavenger Hunt

Photo Scavenger Hunt

Summary: A team-based scavenger hunt with a twist — bringing back digital photos (or polaroids) of interesting places and things. Ages: 14 and up. Recommended number of people: Teams of about 4 people. Messiness Factor: Be prepared to walk around. Materials Required: Cameras for each team. Recommended Setting: Outdoors. Photo Scavenger Hunt Prepare a list of about ten interesting places, things, and circumstances that can be captured using a camera. You could list, for example: A group photo with someone famous The most relaxing place you can find The biggest tree A group photo with someone dressed in a tuxedo A photo with a yellow car A fast food worker A human pyramid of at least seven people The funniest thing you can find And so on. Be creative. Divide the group into teams of about four people. Make sure each team has at least one functioning camera (preferably digital, although polaroid is okay too). Set a time limit for the groups (e.g. two hours or so). Instruct the teams to find as many things on the list and take a picture with all the group members in the photo. When time expires, have all members reconvene and present their photos along with the checklist. Award one point for each successful photo item and bonus points for extra creativity or effort. This activity is good for building team chemistry and for creating funny memories. Be sure to provide adequate supervision if there are young participants. Have fun, and always keep safety first! See also another excellent guide for how to play the Photo Scavenger...
Human Knot Icebreaker

Human Knot Icebreaker

Summary: A good icebreaker or teambuilding activity for new people to learn to work together – in close physical proximity! The goal is to figure out how to untangle the human knot without letting go of hands. Ages: 12 and up. Recommended number of people: 7-200 (group sizes of 10 are ideal). Messiness factor: Might break a sweat – (close proximity – hope you’re not claustrophobic!). Materials required: None. Recommended setting: Both indoors or outdoors. Human Knot Game Goals of the Human Knot Game: Team building and communication Problem solving Ice-breaker or get to know others better Setup for the Human Knot Game: This game is versatile in that multiple group sizes can play. Form groups of about 10 people each. Have each group standing, facing towards each other, in a circle. Each person should be standing shoulder to shoulder. First, instruct everyone to lift their left hand and reach across to take the hand of someone standing across the circle. Next, have everyone lift their right and reach across to take the hand of another person standing across the circle. Make sure that no one is holding hands with someone standing directly beside the person. How to Play the Human Knot Game To play, the groups must communicate and figure out how to untangle the knot (forming a circle of people) without ever letting go of any hands. If you wish, this icebreaker can be played competitively, in which the facilitator says “Ready.. Set.. Go!” and has all the groups race to become the first group to finish. If any group member lets go of a hand (breaks...

Commonalities and Uniquities

Summary: A group team-building activity in which people identify common things that everyone has in common, along with interesting characteristics that are unique to a person in the group. Ages: 12 and up. Recommended number of people: Groups of 5-8. Messiness factor: No sweat. Materials required: Two sheets of paper and a pen for each group. Recommended setting: Indoors. Commonalities and Uniquities Form groups of five to eight people and give them two sheets of paper and a pencil or pen. The first part of the activity is Commonalities, where each subgroup compiles a list of the things they have in common. In order for it to make the list, it must apply to everyone in the subgroup. You want to avoid writing things that people can see (e.g. “everyone has hair,” or “we are all wearing clothes”). Try to get them to dig deeper. After about 5 minutes, have a spokesperson from each subgroup read their list. Then, depending on your goals for the session, you can have half of each subgroup rotate to another group for Uniquities or you can leave everyone in the same group. On the second sheet of paper have them record uniquities, meaning that each item applies to only one person in the group. The group tries to find at least 2 uniquities for each person. After 5-7 minutes, you can have each person say one of their uniquities or have a person read them one by one, having others try to guess who it was. (Again, you want to go beyond the superficial, avoiding those things that people can readily see). This...
Great Egg Drop

Great Egg Drop

Summary: A team building exercise in which groups build structures and try to prevent an egg from breaking. A judge tosses all structures (with the eggs inside) from a high elevation at the end. The winners are the groups that successfully protect the egg. Ages: 14 and up. Recommended # of People: Several groups of 4-5. Messiness Factor: Quite messy. Materials required: Raw eggs, several straws, masking tape, newspaper, and any other materials for building. The Great Egg Drop Instructions The Great Egg Drop is a teambuilding activity that involves creativity and problem solving given a set of resources.  To begin, assemble groups of 4 or 5 and give each group various materials for building (e.g. 5-20 straws, a roll of masking tape, one fresh egg, newspaper, etc.). Alternatively, you can give no materials and ask the participants to find materials from outdoors, but this increases the difficulty level significantly. Instruct the participants and give them a set amount of time (e.g. 30 minutes) to complete building a structure, with the egg inside. When time expires, collect all structures and then dramatic finale in which the structures are dropped from at least 10 feet in elevation and then inspected to see if the eggs survived. The winners are the groups that were successful in protecting the egg. Many variations are possible — additional constraints, for example. This activity is useful to illustrate the importance of team and to highlight aspects of project...
Trust Walk Activity

Trust Walk Activity

Summary: A team building activity centered around trust. A leader gives verbal or nonverbal instructions to navigate a blindfolded partner to avoid obstacles. Ages: 14 and up. Recommended number of people: Pairs. Messiness factor: Might break a small sweat. Materials required: Blindfolds. Recommended setting: Outdoors, in a location with no dangerous obstacles. Trust Walk Activity The Trust Walk Activity is a team building activity involving leadership and lots of trust as people navigate each other around obstacles. Instructions Find a good location with some obstacles, but nothing dangerous. Some good locations may include the woods or a large field. Form pairs. Ask one partner to be the navigator (guide), and the other to be blindfolded. When the blindfolded partner is ready, slowly spin the person around a few times so that they do not know which direction they are headed. From this point on, the guide should not touch the partnert at all, but rely solely on verbal cues (e.g. “About five steps ahead, there is a branch. Step over it slowly.”) The guide is solely responsible for his or her partner’s safety. He or she should be navigated to avoid obstacles. In this way, participants learn valuable lessons related to teamwork: the guide learns about the challenge and responsibility of caring for another individual’s well being, while the blindfolded partner learns to trust and rely on another person. Ask participants to reflect and share upon their experiences. Sample Questions to Ask During Debrief To help participants reflect and learn upon their experiences, the following are some good sample questions to ask following the Trust Walk team building activity: What do...
Bigger and Better Game

Bigger and Better Game

Summary: A teambuilding activity in which teams are given a small object (e.g. paperclips) and must keep trading and upgrading their objects to get the biggest, best objects possible until the time limit expires. The objects are judged for size, value, and creativity. Ages: 14 and up. Recommended # of People: Teams of 2-10 people. Messiness Factor: Light. Materials: Paper clips or other small objects. Recommended Setting: Outdoors. Bigger and Better Instructions: How is it possible to turn a paper clip into a guitar, laundry machine, bicycle, or other huge objects like a yacht? Through a team-building activity called Bigger and Better! Split the teams into groups of two to ten, depending on the size of your overall group. Distribute paper clips (or some other small object) to each group. Clearly indicate the time limit for this activity (e.g. 2-3 hours), and let them go off to trade. The goal is to come back with the biggest, best, most creative object after a series of trading and upgrading. We recommend to you to visit on a site. When the time expires, everyone reconvenes at a predefined location for the show-and-tell and judging process. Judges choose the best items on various criteria: size, value, creativity, and overall best. This game has benefits of having team members work together and think creatively on how to upgrade their items. Camaraderie is gained through this fun process –...
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