Ice Breakers Archives - Page 3 of 4 - Group games, team games, ice breakers
Bowl Icebreaker Game

Bowl Icebreaker Game

Summary: A rapid-fire guessing game in which players write many clues and place them in a bowl. Ages: All. Recommended # of People: 10-20. Messiness Factor: No Sweat. Materials Required: Bowl, lots of paper, and pens. Recommended Setting: Indoors. The Bowl Game How to Play The Bowl Game is a personalized guessing game useful for parties and other gatherings. To prepare for the game, cut paper into small pieces, yet big enough to write on. Have the players write down virtually anything that can be used for guessing: objects, famous people, movies, places, anything that comes to mind. Fold the pieces up and put them into the bowl. Divide into two teams. Each team has one minute to describe as many pieces of paper from the bowl as possible without saying the word on the paper. Each team gets one pass per turn and after that it is minus one point for every pass. Whoever has the most points when the terms in the bowl run out wins.Variations include: Doing charades with the same set of clues for the second round, followed by being allowed to say one word only for the third round....
Two Truths and a Lie

Two Truths and a Lie

Summary: A classic get-to-know-you icebreaker in which each person says two truths and one lie. The goal is to figure out which statement is actually the lie! Ages: All. Recommended # of people: 6-10. Messiness factor: No Sweat. Materials Required: None. Recommended Setting: Indoors. Two Truths and a Lie Two Truths and a Lie is a classic icebreaker game in which one attempts to identify which of three statements is bogus. Instructions: Have everyone sit in a circle. Each person prepares three statements, two of which are true and one of which is a lie. In any order, the person shares the three statements to the entire group. The object of the game is to figure out which statement a lie. The rest of the group votes on each statement, and the person reveals which one is the lie. Variation: Two Truths and a Dream Wish. As an interesting variation to the classic Two Truths and a Lie icebreaker, people may also play a version called Two Truths and a Dream Wish. Instead of stating a lie, a person says something that is not true — yet something that they wish to be true. For example, someone that has never been to Hawaii might say: “I have visited Hawaii when I was young.” This interesting spin often leads to unexpected, fascinating results, as people often share touching wishes about their...
Superlatives Game

Superlatives Game

Summary: An icebreaker where players must quickly arrange themselves in proper order — smallest to biggest, farthest away to closet, least to most, etc. Ages: All. Recommended # of People: Teams of 5 or more. Messiness Factor: A little hectic. Materials Required: None. Recommended Setting: Indoors. Superlatives Game A good, brief icebreaker game that can be an interesting way to see how people compare. Get to know other players in silly categories. The goal is for players to reorder themselves as quickly as possible. Instructions: Teams should be medium to large size, about five players or more. Large groups are okay, but ideally teams should be about 5-10 people. To begin, have the facilitator ask all teams to stand up. He or she announces a category, such as: “How many letters are in your first name? From shortest to tallest.” “Where is your birthplace? Arrange from the person most farthest away to the person closest to your current city.” “How many hats do you own? From least to most.” “How many brothers or sisters do you have? From least to most.” “Height, from shortest to tallest.” As soon as each superlative is announced, teams quickly figure out the proper order and sit down when done. The judge checks to make sure they have done it correctly. The first team to do it right wins the round. Have fun and be creative with the...
Simon Says

Simon Says

Summary: A classic kids’ icebreaker/stationary game in which the leader, Simon, instructs people to do various actions. The goal is to only do something when Simon says so, and to do nothing when he doesn’t. Ages: All ages. Recommended number of people: Any size group, including large groups. Messiness factor: No sweat. Materials required: Nothing. Recommended setting: Indoors. Simon Says Game Simon Says is a classic game that is traditionally played by kids and families, although it can also work with college students and adults as a lighthearted icebreaker. How to Play Simon Says One person plays the role of “Simon”, and he or she stands facing the crowd. Simon explains the rules: “I am Simon. I will give you instructions to do various actions, and you must imitate my actions. I will instruct you to do various things by saying ‘Simon says, do something’, where something is an action like touching your head, waving your hand, and so on. If you do something without me saying ‘Simon says’, then you are eliminated for that round.” Simon (the game facilitator) then proceeds to say various commands (while demonstrating the action), sometimes beginning them with ‘Simon says’, and other times not. These commands can include the following (be creative!):   Pat your head Smile Wave hello Flex your biceps Touch your toes Turn around Strategies for Simon A good way to get many people eliminated at the very beginning of the game is to explain the rules, and then say: “Ready to play? Okay, everybody stand up.” Whenever many people stand to their feet, they will all be eliminated for...

Straws Question Game

Summary: A useful icebreaker game to get people to know each other better, using specially marked straws. Ages: 8 and up. Recommended number of players: Any number of players from 4 to 30. Messiness factor: No mess at all! Materials required: Several straws, a cup, and a sharpie. Straws Game The Straws Question Game is a great way to break the ice and allow people to get to know each other better in a more comfortable way. A question will be asked to the entire group, and then each player draws a straw. A small number of straws will be specially marked. Each player that draws the special straw answers the question. Setup Before the game begins, count out one straw for each player. Mark the ends of a small number of straws with a sharpie marker. The number of straws to mark depends on how many people you would like to answer the question — usually, three or four is a good number for a group of 10-20 people. Prepare a number of questions for the group to answer. You can ask any kind of question you like, depending on what kind of game you want. If you want players to get to know each other better, you can ask questions like, “What is your dream job?” or “What is your favorite place on earth?” If you’d rather ask questions that allow for more creativity or humor, you could ask questions such as “If you could be any animal, what would you be?” or “What was your worst date experience?” Playing the Straws Question Game Place all the straws...
Hodgy Podgy

Hodgy Podgy

Summary: Hodgy Podgy is a simple (and entertaining!) rhythm game that has each person go around taking turns adding words to create a story. Ages: 10 and up. Recommend # of people: 6-15. Messiness factor: No Sweat. Materials Required: None. Recommended Setting: Indoors. Instructions: Hodgy Podgy (also known as Hodgey Podgey and the Hodgy Podgy Word Game) is a simple yet very fun rhythm game. A group of people stand in a circle, with everyone facing the center. Choose a person who will start the round. He or she starts to clap a relatively slow rhythm (slap both legs on the first beat, then clap hands on second beat, thumbs-up on left hand for third beat, and thumbs-up on right hand on fourth beat, and repeat the four beat cycle). Everyone in the circle matches the rhythm set by the leader. To start each round, the leader says (while clapping to the rhythm, one beat per word), “Hodgy podgy, hodgy podgy, hodgy podgy, hodgy podgy!” The leader starts a sentence by saying any word on the one beat (for example, he or she could say the word “Big” as he or she slaps their legs on beat one). The next person in the circle must continue the story by adding the next word in the sentence by the first beat of the next rhythm cycle (for example, the 2nd person could say “dogs,” so the sentence is now “Big dogs..”). The third person in the circle must continue the story by adding the 3rd word in the sentence at the right time (for example, the person could say the...
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