Group games, team games, ice breakers - How to play icebreakers, group games, fun games, party games, teambuilding activities!

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Free instructions to 67+ of the best group games! Perfect for your next event. Read, play and share our site! See the full list here. Game ideas are also organized by group type and...

Reaction Game

Summary: A funny icebreaker/stationary acting game in which a person randomly chooses an event (e.g. winning the lottery or being surprised by an wedding proposal) and must act out his or her reaction to this event. Based on this reaction, team members try to guess what the event was. Ages: All. Recommended # of People: Groups or teams of 6-12 people. Messiness Factor: Might break a small sweat. Materials Required: Sheets of paper, pens, a container to hold the paper. Recommended Setting: Indoors. Reaction Game Form groups of six to twelve people. If playing this game with a very large group as an icebreaker, you can also choose four or five volunteers and have them go to the front of the room. The first step is to ask players to create some events. Give each player small sheets of paper and pens. Ask each player write some events. Encourage creativity. Some examples of events: Being attacked by a shark while fishing Hitting a home run to win the World Series Watching the lottery and realizing that you have the winning number Being presented a large engagement ring and proposed for marriage Going on a first date with an attractive person After people are done writing events, collect the sheets and place them in the container (a hat or small bag will do). Within groups, choose three or four people to act for each round. Ask the players to randomly draw an event from the container. Without giving away what the event is, give each player 30 seconds to 1 minute to act out a reaction to the event they received. They may act out using charades rules, and they can also make noises...
Giants, Wizards, and Elves

Giants, Wizards, and Elves

Summary: An icebreaker / action oriented game good for medium and large sized groups. Similar to a game of rock, paper, scissors, two teams face off and decide to become either “giants,” “wizards,” or “elves.” Giants defeat elves, elves defeat wizards, and wizards defeat giants. Ages: 10 and up. Recommended # of People: 20 and up (large groups work fine too!). Messiness factor: Might break a small sweat! Materials Required: None. Recommended Setting: Indoors or Outdoors. Giants, Wizards, & Elves Giants, Wizards, and Elves is a fun, silly icebreaker game that is a good way to break the ice at meetings or in classrooms. It’s a simple game based on the classic game of rock, paper, scissors. Setup Teach everyone how to become three characters: the giant, the wizard, and the elf. Each character features hand motions and a noise. For the giant, each person stands on their tippy toes, lifts up their arms, and makes an angry growling noise: “Roooar!” For the wizard, each person crouches a little bit, flutters their fingers as though they are casting a spell, and they make a magical noise: “Woooo!” For the elf, each person gets down very low on their knees, cups their hands around their ears, and makes a high pitched elf noise: “Eeeeee!” Practice each motion together a few times. Divide everyone into two teams and have them separate into opposite sides of the room. The game invovles several rounds. For each round, the following takes place: Each team forms a huddle and decides to become a giant, wizard, or elf. Both teams then line up and face each...

Team Story Game

Summary: A funny storywriting game that involves creating a story as a team. Each player adds the next line of the story. Ages: 8 and up. Recommended number of players: Teams of at least six. Messiness factor: No mess! Materials required: None – just a great sense of humor! Team Story Game The Team Story Game (also known as the “Once Upon a Time…” Game is a funny game involving creativity and a group of people making a story together. Setup Form teams of at least six players. You can prepare a theme in advance if you wish. For example, you can require all stories to be about a certain topic (e.g. Christmas, or food, or relationships). Have everyone form a line. Playing the Team Story Game Each team will construct a story. Each person is only allowed to say one sentence and must continue the story. The first player in line begins the story by saying “Once upon a time…” and completes the sentence. The next person in line must continue the story and have it make sense. This process continues until it reaches the last person in the team’s line. The last person in line must conclude the story in one sentence as well. Have team create a story. If you wish, judges can decide which story is the best. This game is a silly game that usually leads to hilarious...
Amoeba Game

Amoeba Game

Summary: An action oriented game where people hold hands and form an amoeba-like shape, and try to get others out of the game. Ages: 10 and up. Recommended # of People: 10-20. Messiness Factor: Sweaty. Materials Required: Safe, Durable Object. Recommended Setting: Indoors or Outdoors The Amoeba Game Instructions: Instruct all players to hold hands and form a large circle. Put a safe, durable object in the middle of the circle. The object of the game is to try and have other people touch the object, by pulling, pushing, etc, but the circular link cannot be broken. If a person touches the object in the center of the circle, he or she is out of the game. The game is over when there is only one person left. Note: This “elimination” aspect of this game may not be ideal in terms of inclusivity and allowing people to play longer. Variations include: having those who touched the object leave the first amoeba, but start to form a second amoeba. You get negative points in the second amoeba by touching the object in the center. This means one amoeba is shrinking while the second one is growing. The end of the game is when there is only one person left in the one amoeba, and everyone else moving around in the second amoeba....
Bigger and Better Game

Bigger and Better Game

Summary: A teambuilding activity in which teams are given a small object (e.g. paperclips) and must keep trading and upgrading their objects to get the biggest, best objects possible until the time limit expires. The objects are judged for size, value, and creativity. Ages: 14 and up. Recommended # of People: Teams of 2-10 people. Messiness Factor: Light. Materials: Paper clips or other small objects. Recommended Setting: Outdoors. Bigger and Better Instructions: How is it possible to turn a paper clip into a guitar, laundry machine, bicycle, or other huge objects like a yacht? Through a team-building activity called Bigger and Better! Split the teams into groups of two to ten, depending on the size of your overall group. Distribute paper clips (or some other small object) to each group. Clearly indicate the time limit for this activity (e.g. 2-3 hours), and let them go off to trade. The goal is to come back with the biggest, best, most creative object after a series of trading and upgrading. We recommend to you to visit on a site. When the time expires, everyone reconvenes at a predefined location for the show-and-tell and judging process. Judges choose the best items on various criteria: size, value, creativity, and overall best. This game has benefits of having team members work together and think creatively on how to upgrade their items. Camaraderie is gained through this fun process –...
Wall Ball

Wall Ball

Summary: Wall Ball is a classic playground game that involves throwing the ball against a wall, catching it without fumbling the ball, and trying to get others out! Many variations exist for this simple group game. Ages: 8 and up. Recommended # of people: At least 4. Messiness Factor: Get ready to break a sweat! Materials required: A small bouncy ball of some sort (e.g. a racquetball, tennis ball, etc.). Recommended Setting: Outdoors or in a very large room with a flat wall (e.g. side of a building) and a hard, flat floor. Rules for Wall Ball Wall Ball is a classic playground game played by children everywhere. It’s fun for adults too! The object of the game is simple: a person throws a ball against a wall, and anyone can try to catch it. The person who tries to catch it must catch it cleanly (no drops). If a person drops the ball or touches the ball in any way without catching it, that person must quickly run up and touch the wall before another person can catch the ball and throw it against the wall. If the ball hits the wall before the player is able to touch it, the person is given a “strike.” Each player gets three “strikes” before they are out of the game (or you can assign some form of mild punishment, like making the person do the chicken dance). Variations Many different various exist for Wall Ball. For example, when someone catches the ball, they can assign rules such as: one handed catch only catch on one foot left handed catch only...
Spoons Game

Spoons Game

Summary: A frantic card game in which players try to be the first to get 4 of a kind. Once one player gets 4 of a kind, everyone quickly tries to grab a spoon from the center! The last person to realize what happened loses the round. Ages: All. Recommended # of people: 6-12. Messiness factor: Not too messy. Materials required: A standard deck of 52 playing cards, and spoons (the total number of players minus one). Recommended Setting: Indoors. Spoons Game (Also Known as the Tongue Game or the Pig Game) Spoons is a high-paced, fun card game to try with your family or friends. All ages can play! Setup for Spoons / Tongue / Pig To play Spoons, all players must sit in a circle, facing inward. Place in the center one spoon for each person, minus one. In other words, if you have nine players, you need eight spoons arranged in the center. Ensure that all players can reach the spoons easily. If you are playing Pig or Tongue, you don’t need any special equipment besides the deck of cards. To prepare the cards, you need exactly four cards of the same rank for each player. For example, if your game has six players, set up the deck so that you have four Aces, four 2’s, four 3’s, four 4’s, four 5’s, and four 6’s. Shuffle the deck of cards. You’re now ready to play! Playing Spoons / Tongue / Pig The goal of the game is to be the first to get four cards the same rank. If an opposing player beats you to it,...
Categories (a.k.a. Scattegories)

Categories (a.k.a. Scattegories)

Summary: A quick thinking game of brainstorming unique items within categories! Ages: All. Recommended # of People: Small groups of 5-10. Messiness Factor: No Sweat. Materials Required: Pens and lots of paper. Recommended Setting: Indoors in a not-too-noisy environment. Categories (Also known as Scattegories) Have you heard of the famous party game called Scattegories? You can play this on your own at parties or hanging out with friends. Set-Up Prepare a list of categories. This can include embarrassing items, sports, snacks, movie names, or anything else you wish. Give each player a writing utensil and a sheet of paper. Randomly choose a letter of the alphabet. Note that the letters Q, U, V, Z, Y or Z are usually too hard, so you may wish to avoid those letters. Set a countdown timer for one minute. Playing the game You receive one point for every unique (not shared by any other player) word that starts with the given letter and fit into the given category. Start the one minute timer. Write down as many valid words (those that fit the category and start with the correct letter) for the category as you can. When the timer ends, stop writing. Go clockwise and have each player read aloud their words. If someone else has the same word, both players cross out that word (no points are earned). If a word is read that doesn’t seem to be a good fit for the category, the other players vote on whether to accept the word or cross it off. In the case of a tie, the word is disqualified. Each word that remains is worth...
Human Sculptures Game

Human Sculptures Game

Summary: Human Sculptures (also known as Human Clay) is an icebreaker group game that involves posing people into large human sculptures based on predefined topics. Two versions exist: a competitive version based on a guessing game, and a version that is more about coming up with a creative interpretation. Ages: 12 and up. Recommended number of people: Groups of at least three. Messiness factor: Minimal – hold a pose for a few minutes. Materials required: Sheets of paper and pens. Recommended setting: Indoors or outdoors. Human Sculptures Game Human Sculptures is a fun game that be used as an icebreaker activity or as a general party game. There are two variations of this game — one version is a competitive guessing game, while the other version is an based on creative interpreptations of various topics. The instructions for both versions are below. How to Play Human Sculptures: Guessing Game VersionThe facilitator should announce a category (e.g. famous movies or famous songs — the more specific the better). All players are then divided into smaller groups and one team leader is given a pen and paper. Each group brainstorms an idea that goes along with the topic and each team leader must write down the idea on a sheet of paper and turn it in to the leader, who checks that the idea is appropriate for use. Each group then creates a sculpture using their bodies. Every member of the group should comprise some part of the entire sculpture. After a predefined time limit (for example, five minutes), each team looks at each other’s sculpture. Each team is allowed two guesses...
A Thousand Blank White Cards

A Thousand Blank White Cards

Summary: A unique open-ended activity that lets players create the rules on white cards! Ages: All. Recommended # of People: 5-6. Messiness Factor: You’ll move around. Materials Required: pens, blank white cards, an open space. A Thousand Blank White Cards How to Play A Thousand Blank White Cards is a fun game that will ask players to make up creative rules. Everyone starts with a wide open blank canvas. The facilitator should prepare small stacks (7-8) of white index cards. For about $10 you can large packs of cards online from Amazon. Give each person a pen. Instruct everyone on how to create a good card. Each card should have (1) a title, (2) a consequence, and (3) a simple drawing. For example: A giant dinosaur arrives. Everybody must scream in fear. Everyone loses 1200 points. Cookie Monster. For each card in the discard pile, cookie monster eats these. You get 100 points each. Ghosts come alive. Search the cards in the discard pile and take one. Play it. Exercise bunny. While this card is in front of you, you must do 8 jumping jacks before you take your turn. Pirate ship. Speak like a pirate for one turn, then disc-ARRRRR-d this card. Some cards can describe a way to win the game. Other cards can react to that (an “Undo” card or a reaction card if someone seemingly wins, it can take away their win). More explanation on that below. Each player writes various cards, each with the 3 required parts as described above. It should have the title, consequence and drawing. It can be funny and involve silly actions as...
Bowl Icebreaker Game

Bowl Icebreaker Game

Summary: A rapid-fire guessing game in which players write many clues and place them in a bowl. Ages: All. Recommended # of People: 10-20. Messiness Factor: No Sweat. Materials Required: Bowl, lots of paper, and pens. Recommended Setting: Indoors. The Bowl Game How to Play The Bowl Game is a personalized guessing game useful for parties and other gatherings. To prepare for the game, cut paper into small pieces, yet big enough to write on. Have the players write down virtually anything that can be used for guessing: objects, famous people, movies, places, anything that comes to mind. Fold the pieces up and put them into the bowl. Divide into two teams. Each team has one minute to describe as many pieces of paper from the bowl as possible without saying the word on the paper. Each team gets one pass per turn and after that it is minus one point for every pass. Whoever has the most points when the terms in the bowl run out wins.Variations include: Doing charades with the same set of clues for the second round, followed by being allowed to say one word only for the third round....
Stranded on a Island

Stranded on a Island

Summary: A teambuilding activity that asks people to identify what object they would bring if they were to be stranded on a deserted island. Each person discusses why they brought the object. Within groups, people decide how to improve their chances of survival by combining various objects. Ages: 12 and up. Recommended number of people: Groups of 5 to 10. Messiness factor: No sweat. Materials required: Paper and pen, if desired. Recommended setting: Indoors. Stranded on a Island Stranded on a Island is a useful team building activity to help people get to know each other better. Form groups of about five to ten people and give the following instructions: “Unfortunately, you will be relocated and stranded on a deserted island for an indefinite amount of time. You may only bring one item to the island, and you only have a few minutes notice. What will you bring? Share with your group your object, why you chose it, and what you plan to do with it.” Have each person briefly share their item, why it is important to them, and what they plan to do with it. After everyone has shared, instruct the groups to figure out how they can improve their chances of survival by combining the items in creative ways. Allow ten to fifteen minutes of brainstorming time, and then have each group present their ideas. Give a prize to the winner (most creative group) if desired. (Contributed by Jeff T.) Thanks...
Two Truths and a Lie

Two Truths and a Lie

Summary: A classic get-to-know-you icebreaker in which each person says two truths and one lie. The goal is to figure out which statement is actually the lie! Ages: All. Recommended # of people: 6-10. Messiness factor: No Sweat. Materials Required: None. Recommended Setting: Indoors. Two Truths and a Lie Two Truths and a Lie is a classic icebreaker game in which one attempts to identify which of three statements is bogus. Instructions: Have everyone sit in a circle. Each person prepares three statements, two of which are true and one of which is a lie. In any order, the person shares the three statements to the entire group. The object of the game is to figure out which statement a lie. The rest of the group votes on each statement, and the person reveals which one is the lie. Variation: Two Truths and a Dream Wish. As an interesting variation to the classic Two Truths and a Lie icebreaker, people may also play a version called Two Truths and a Dream Wish. Instead of stating a lie, a person says something that is not true — yet something that they wish to be true. For example, someone that has never been to Hawaii might say: “I have visited Hawaii when I was young.” This interesting spin often leads to unexpected, fascinating results, as people often share touching wishes about their...
Signs Game

Signs Game

Summary: Signs is a simple party game involving stealth, silliness, and not getting caught! Players seated in a circle attempt to “pass” a sign (hand motion or gestures) to each other while a guesser tries to catch the person who currently has the sign. Ages: 12 and up. Recommended # of people: Groups of 10-20 people. Messiness Factor: No mess! Materials required: None. Recommended Setting: Indoors. Instructions for the Signs Game The Signs Game is a fun game involving stealthiness that tends to work well with medium to large sized groups. This stationary game works well with both kids and adults, and in many settings: parties, youth/college group settings, camps, etc. Setup for the Signs Game Have everyone sit in a large circle, facing inward towards each other. Every player seated now must choose a “sign,” some kind of movement or motion that is unique to them. A sign must be easily detectable by others, although not too obvious to attract a lot of attention. Good examples of possible signs could include: waving your right hand squeezing your nose patting the top of your head twice sticking your tongue out making two thumbs up Once everyone has created a sign, he or she announces and demonstrates their sign to the rest of the group. You’re now ready to play the game. Playing the Signs Game The goal of Signs is to be stealthy and to try to keep passing signs to other players as long as possible, without getting caught by a guesser who must stand in the center of the circle. The guesser tries to figure out where...
Telephone Charades

Telephone Charades

Summary: An icebreaker / stationary game in which a person acts out an action only for the next person in line, who in turn acts out for the next person. The acting typically becomes distorted over time and hilarious, as the last person in line tries to guess what the original clue was. Ages: 10 and up. Recommended # of People: 5-6. Messiness Factor: No Sweat. Materials Required: None. Recommended Setting: Indoors. Telephone Charades How to Play The Telephone Charades Game (also sometimes called “Charades Down the Line”) is an icebreaker/stationary game that is a hilarious blend of the classic “telephone down the line” and “charades” game. This group game is fairly simple to play. Select five to six participants and ask them to leave the room. The audience chooses an action that is specific, silly, and obscure to act out (e.g. “a nerd’s romantic first date”, “washing an elephant”, “going skydiving”, etc.). Once the clue has been decided, bring in all the participants and instruct them to face the right side. The moderator reveals the clue to the first person, who taps the second person on the shoulder and acts out the topic using charades rules (no talking allowed, no noises). The second person then taps the third person and acts out his or her understanding of what was acted out. This continues until it reaches the last person in line, who must guess what the action is. This game is funny because the action mutates and changes based upon each person’s interpretation of what is going on, often leading to confusion and silly motions....
Sticker Ninja

Sticker Ninja

Summary: Sticker Ninja is a great party game involving skill and stealth! Secretly try to place all your stickers on other party guests. Ages: 10 and up. Recommended # of People: 10-30. Messiness Factor: No Sweat. Materials: Sticker sheets. Recommended Setting: Indoors, during a party. Can be played over the course of a few hours, while guests are eating, mingling or doing other things. Sticker Ninja Purchase several sticker sheets. Each sheet of stickers should have an equal number of stickers (at least 5). Give a sheet to each guest (or cut a sheet into smaller sections if you wish). How to Play The goal of the game is to secretly stick their stickers on other guests at the party. If a player does not catch another player in the act, they must retain the sticker. To win, a player must get rid of all of his or her stickers. He or she announces this to the others at the party. You can also play this game in teams if you...
Secret Santa Gift Exchange

Secret Santa Gift Exchange

Summary: A very fun group game for the holidays that involves giving a gift to a secret target person! Ages: 12 and up. Recommend number of people: 10-20. Messiness factor: Not messy at all! Materials: Gifts, tape, gift wrap. Setting: Indoors. Secret Santa Gift Exchange Secret Santa is a great party game that is ideal for Christmas time (or whatever gift-giving holiday you love to celebrate!). There is some preparation involved for each player, as well as a small cost involved. Each person must buy a gift of a similar price value (up to $12, for example) and a game coordinator needs to randomly assign each player to another player (their secret gift recipient). Each player has a certain amount of time to buy a gift and deliver it to their target (for example, two weeks). Alternatively, have a gift organizer collect the gifts and distribute them at a certain time. Have fun! And you thought Santa wasn’t real. If you enjoy this game, please share it with your friends! Dissertation writing service check this out http://customessaywriter.org/dissertation help...

Mother May I?

Summary: Mother May I is a classic kids’ game in which kids request to take a certain number and type of steps (baby, normal, giant, etc.) towards the “mother”. Kids must remember to ask “Mother May I?” The first to touch the mother wins and becomes the new mother. Ages: Younger kids. Recommended number of people: Less than 10. Messiness factor: Might break a little sweat. Materials required: None. Recommended setting: Outdoors. Mother May I (also known as Captain May I) How to Play This game is a simple childhood action game that might be good for reinforcing the use of manners. One person is chosen as the “mother” (or “captain” if it is a male). She or he stands facing away from a line of kids and selects a child at random, or in order. The mother/captain calls out a direction, step type, and number of steps. For example, the mother/captain can say: “Scott, you may take seven (or any other number)’ baby/normal/giant steps forward/backward.”The child then responds with “Mother may I?” (or “Captain may I?” if it is a male player in charge). The mother/captain states “Yes” or “No”, depending on her whim, and the child obeys and takes the steps. If the child forgets to ask “Mother may I?” then he/she goes back to the beginning of the line. The first one to touch the Mother/Captain wins and becomes the new Mother/Captain. An alternate version of the game is similar: each child takes turns asking, “Mother/Captain may I take [x kind of] steps?” The child who is mother (or captain) replies yes or no. There are other...
Superlatives Game

Superlatives Game

Summary: An icebreaker where players must quickly arrange themselves in proper order — smallest to biggest, farthest away to closet, least to most, etc. Ages: All. Recommended # of People: Teams of 5 or more. Messiness Factor: A little hectic. Materials Required: None. Recommended Setting: Indoors. Superlatives Game A good, brief icebreaker game that can be an interesting way to see how people compare. Get to know other players in silly categories. The goal is for players to reorder themselves as quickly as possible. Instructions: Teams should be medium to large size, about five players or more. Large groups are okay, but ideally teams should be about 5-10 people. To begin, have the facilitator ask all teams to stand up. He or she announces a category, such as: “How many letters are in your first name? From shortest to tallest.” “Where is your birthplace? Arrange from the person most farthest away to the person closest to your current city.” “How many hats do you own? From least to most.” “How many brothers or sisters do you have? From least to most.” “Height, from shortest to tallest.” As soon as each superlative is announced, teams quickly figure out the proper order and sit down when done. The judge checks to make sure they have done it correctly. The first team to do it right wins the round. Have fun and be creative with the...
Simon Says

Simon Says

Summary: A classic kids’ icebreaker/stationary game in which the leader, Simon, instructs people to do various actions. The goal is to only do something when Simon says so, and to do nothing when he doesn’t. Ages: All ages. Recommended number of people: Any size group, including large groups. Messiness factor: No sweat. Materials required: Nothing. Recommended setting: Indoors. Simon Says Game Simon Says is a classic game that is traditionally played by kids and families, although it can also work with college students and adults as a lighthearted icebreaker. How to Play Simon Says One person plays the role of “Simon”, and he or she stands facing the crowd. Simon explains the rules: “I am Simon. I will give you instructions to do various actions, and you must imitate my actions. I will instruct you to do various things by saying ‘Simon says, do something’, where something is an action like touching your head, waving your hand, and so on. If you do something without me saying ‘Simon says’, then you are eliminated for that round.” Simon (the game facilitator) then proceeds to say various commands (while demonstrating the action), sometimes beginning them with ‘Simon says’, and other times not. These commands can include the following (be creative!):   Pat your head Smile Wave hello Flex your biceps Touch your toes Turn around Strategies for Simon A good way to get many people eliminated at the very beginning of the game is to explain the rules, and then say: “Ready to play? Okay, everybody stand up.” Whenever many people stand to their feet, they will all be eliminated for...
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